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DCO 6.2 and 6.3 - Creating Application Profiles and Discovery Maps

Suggest edit Updated on June 10, 2020

Summary

The first step on the path to a successful application is capturing — in business terms — the business process and design requirements of the project and application.

To capture these details for your planned application, use a guided Direct Capture of Objectives (DCO) development tool — the Application Profiler — to create an application profile for that application. The application profile for a particular application is a collection of that information that specifies the business processes, case types, use cases, requirements, and other processing elements associated with implementing the application. The application profile answers the question "What will we build?"

The goal of using the Application Profiler and creating an application profile is to focus discussions and get the project started in the right direction. Business analysts, lead architects, and other project members collaboratively and iteratively create the application profile. This collaborative effort increases the likelihood of a successful implementation because core business questions are asked, discussed, and answers captured in the application profile.

On average, it takes a few days of dedicated effort to build and complete a profile. Then that collection of application information that is represented in the application profile is used to prime the generation of the initial application — thus providing the project with the most relevant information from the start.

 

Suggested Approach

Overview

The output of the Application Profiler is an application profile from which the system can generate a working application. You begin by capturing application information using the Application Profiler. Within the Application Profiler, you can:

  • Discover processes using a visual interactive tool to map process steps as discovery maps.
  • Create an inventory of steps, organized by business processes. The steps are specified in the form of use cases and requirements. Requirements can also be captured for reports, correspondence, and interfaces.
  • Design case type relationships with the desired parent-child relationships.
  • Estimate the size for development efforts of the project.
  • Create iterative on-demand professional-looking work-based proposals

When you complete capturing information using the Application Profiler, the resulting application profile can be used to prime the Application Accelerator and jumpstart the creation of the application.

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Starting the Application Profiler

You start the Application Profiler in the Designer Studio. Application profiles can be created and maintained by users who have access to the Designer Studio.

Important: Do not run the Application Profiler when logged in with the operator ID [email protected] or with another operator ID that uses the access group PegaRULES:Administrators. While the Application Profiler can start and capture information when you are logged in with such operator IDs, the resulting application profiles are not appropriate for subsequent tasks (such as application generation).

To start a new profile:

In the Designer Studio, start the Application Profiler by clicking Application menu down arrow next to the name of the current application, and selecting the New Application > Application Profile.

Application Profile choice in application menu

The system starts the Application Profiler in the Designer Studio, and displays the Application Overview window:

Application Overview window at start of the Application Profiler

To work on an existing profile:

Any existing profiles that are available to your operator ID to modify are listed in the Profiles in Progress list. (A profile is available for you to modify if you created it or the creator gave your operator ID explicit permission to open it). To open a profile from the Profiles in Progress list:

  1. Click Application menu down arrow next to the name of the currently logged-in application.
  2. Select New Application > Profiles in Progress. The Profiles in Progress list displays.
  3. In the Profiles in Progress list, click the name of the profile you want to work on. The Application Profiler opens, using the saved information in that profile.
To locate and open profiles in the system that were created by others, or profiles that you created that are in the Resolved-Withdrawn state:
Use the list of all wizards:
  1. Click Pega button> Application > Tools > All Wizards.

    The list initially displayed is the list of wizard and accelerator tasks that were performed by the current operator. To see profiles that were created by others, clear the Create Operator Is Equal field and click Run.

  2. Click the name of the profile to open it in the Application Profiler.
Note: In addition to profiles, the list of all wizards includes those tasks from non-DCO-related wizards and accelerators in the system.
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Creating a new profile

When you start the Application Profiler to make a new profile, the system displays the Application Overview window used to specify baseline information about the type of application you intend to build, the nature of the project, and the targeted business objectives. So that every profile contains enough information that the system could generate an application from that profile, you must first choose whether this profile is for:

  • Creating a new application.
  • Updating an existing application.

Depending on that choice, you must specify certain information associated with that selection:

When you areBuilding on an existing framework?You must specify
Creating a new application, either:
  • A new framework and implementation
  • A new framework
NoA name for the new application (in Application Name).
Creating a new application built ona framework in the system, one of:
  • A new framework and implementation
  • A new framework
  • A new implementation
YesA name for the new application (in Application Name).

The name of the framework in the system on which to build the new application.

The version of that framework on which to build.
Updating an existing applicationNot
applicable
The name of the application to be updated.

The version of the application.

After specifying the required information, click OK in the Application Overview window.

Example of Application Overview window for a new application that is a new framework:

Application Overview window for Onboarding application

Note: When working on the profile, you can open the Application Overview window and review or update the overview information by selecting Actions > Overview in the main display of the Application Profiler:

Actions menu with Overview selected

After the overview information is specified, a new tab ("Define Application Profile") opens in the Designer Studio with a series of named steps (such as Create Processes). On any step of the Application Profiler, click the Help icon (Contextual help in the wizard) to display help about that step, including choices for fields and controls used in that step.

The Application Profiler tab and its steps in the Designer Studio:

Application Profiler tab and steps

See Steps of the Application Profiler for descriptions of each step.

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Example: Typical sequence for making a profile for a simple application

This section gives an overview of the basic steps used when making a profile for a new simple application. While you can work on steps in the Application Profiler in any order, this example provides a typical sequence to follow for creating a profile for a new simple application.

Because an application profile is created in the context of the business objectives the application is intended to meet, this example uses the following business scenario.

Business scenario:
The Globex organization wants an Onboarding system, built as a framework, that can provide automation and increase efficiency by 15 percent for getting a new hire started in the company. The goal of this application profile is to generate the first slice of application functionality that will automate the manual "Equipment Request" process the HR staff members and hiring managers are currently using.
 
Process and work type:
For this slice of the Onboarding system, the work type is Equipment Request. The organization is currently using a manual, paper-based equipment request process for getting equipment for new hires.

Note: This scenario is also used in the Building your first application tutorial.

Sequence for creating the profile for this simple scenario

Best practice tip: Use the Actions > Save choice to periodically save your work in progress whenever you enter information into a profile. While the system automatically saves detail entered in a profile step as you move from that step to another, periodically saving your work is helpful on steps where you are entering large amounts of data over a period of time (such as when working on the Create Processes or Project Explorer steps).

Start the Application Profiler in the Designer Studio, and then follow this sequence.

Sequence stepUsingSample inputs/results
1. Capture basic project details.Application Overview window
Profile option:New Application
Build:New Framework
Build on Framework:None
Application Name:Onboarding

See example.

2. Specify the actors that participate in the business process steps.Actors window (select Actions > Actors)Actors:
  • HR Staff Member
  • Hiring Manager
  • The System
3. Update the default work type details to match the business situationCreate Processes step - Discovery Mapview:

Edit the work type details using the Options menu next to Work Type and selecting the Edit work type details choice.

Edit work type details

The Edit Work Type Details window opens for entering the details.

Work type details:
NameEquipmentRequest
Display LabelEquipment Request
ComplexityLow
PrefixER
DescriptionEquipment request work item
4. Rename the default process to match the business situationCreate Processes step - Discovery Mapview:

Edit the process name using the Options menu next to Starting Process and selecting the Edit process name choice.

Edit process name

Process name: Start Equipment Request
5. Capture essential process steps in discovery maps.Create Processes step - Discovery Mapview:

Map out the essential atomic use cases (steps) of the process.

Example discovery map with use cases for the Start Equipment Requestprocess:

Discovery map for Start Equipment Request

6. Create the project sizingSizing window (select Actions > Sizing)See example.
7. Create an application profile document.Document window (select Actions > Document)See example.
8. Review work types, use cases, and requirements.Project Explorerstep:

Process Explorer step in Application Profiler

EquipmentRequest work type and use cases on the Project Explorerstep:

EquipmentRequest work type and use cases

9. Finish the profile.Click Finish on the Project Explorer step.Resolved-Completed message after finishing the profile

After you complete the profile, the system can use it to generate a working, baseline application.

Note: When the profile specifies that the to-be application is either:
  • Built upon an existing application (when building a new framework, new framework and implementation, or new implementation on an existing framework)
  • Updating an existing application

Before generating the to-be application, you must switch your current in-context application to that existing framework or existing application. Your current in-context application is displayed in the Designer Studio header bar. It is sometimes referred to as your logged-in application.

Current in-context application

To switch to the existing application, click Application menu down arrow next to the name of the current in-context application, and select the existing application from the Switch Application menu.

Switch Application menu

For example, if the profile specifies that the to-be application is a new framework built on the NewHireApp framework, and the NewHireApp framework is not currently the in-context application, after clicking Finish, close the Application Profiler, and switch to the NewHireApp framework before generating the application.

This sample sequence describes creating a profile for a simple slice of functionality. For more complex projects, you would capture information about other areas of the application and project, such as:

  • Cases and subcases, and their relationships to each other
  • Interfaces that the application will either connect to or be called from as a service
  • Reporting detail required by the application
  • Correspondence that the application will use (such as emails, faxes, and letters)
  • Project assumptions
  • Project participants
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Discovering processes and making discovery maps

By default, the system initially displays the Discovery Map view on the Create Processes step. A discovery map visually illustrates, in a simple format, the high level representation of a process for a particular work type in the application, including its subprocesses and its alternate processing steps. Using this tool, business analysts, lead architects, and other project members perform iterative and ongoing process discovery, and build an organized visual inventory of steps. For each step, you associate the use cases and requirements that describe how to implement the step.

 

When a profile is finished and used to generate the application, the system uses the discovery map to create the flow rules and draft starting process diagrams, retaining the association of use cases and requirements with the process diagram shapes.

Mapping example

You typically work with the discovery map for one work type and starting process at a time. Select the work type in the Work Type list and the starting process in the Starting Process list.

Work Type and Starting Process drop-down lists in Discovery Map view

The system refreshes the Create Processes step to display the name of the selected starting process and the discovery map for that process.

The following example maps the starting process and subprocesses for a business operation that creates an employee purchase request. The work type is named Purchase and the starting process is named Start Purchase.

In the discovery map:

  • A mapping element is called a step.
  • The primary path of a process runs from left to right along the top row of the map.
  • Subprocesses run from top to bottom below a step in the primary path. A subprocess can have its own subprocesses.
  • A step is populated with a colored shape. The shape's color corresponds to the type of process step, specified in its use case details.
  • Alternate paths can be added to the primary path as well as to a subprocess, and are indicated by double red lines between steps.
  • Use cases and requirements can be entered for each step on the map as well as for the work type and starting process.
  • A appears at the top of a step's shape to indicate that a use case description has been entered for that step.
Discovery map for mapping example:

Configuration Tip: If you are building this application on another application or framework, you can populate the map with processing steps from the starting processes and subprocesses from the underlying application layers including the use cases and requirements linked to those steps. This happens if the Include Parent field on the General tab of the underlying Application rule forms is checked before you create the application profile and run the Application Accelerator.

Although selecting this checkbox does not allow you to alter existing flows, it does allow you to edit the use cases and requirements and copy steps to your new starting processes and subprocess. When the system generates the application, changes made to existing use cases and requirements are saved and updated.

Updating and adding work types

Use the Options menu next to the Work Type list to edit the work type details, add a work type, or delete a work type.

Work Type Options menu

Tip: When adding a work type, begin the name of the work type with an alphabetic character. It is a best practice to start the name with an uppercase letter.

Updating and adding starting processes

Use the Options menu next to the Starting Process list to:

  • Edit the starting process's name
  • Add or delete a starting process
  • Define or delete a use case and associated requirements for the starting process
  • Define or delete a use case and associated requirements for the starting screen of the process

Starting Process Options menu

Mapping a process

The basic approach to mapping a process involves:

  • Gathering the known atomic use cases for the process.
  • Adding process steps (according to the use cases) to the map.
  • Entering names for each step (based on the use case names).
  • Associating a use case and its requirements (if any) with each step.

The group of business analysts, lead system architects, and others who are collaborating on the profile can approach these steps in any order. For example, the group might want to lay out all of the steps in the map first, naming them as they are added, and then associate the use cases with each step. Alternatively, the group might want to lay out some steps in a subprocess, name them and associate use cases, and then lay out the next subprocess, and so on. By collaborating in this method, the group might realize additional atomic use cases that should be included and incorporate those steps into the map.

To add a new step to the map:

A new step is added using an empty box on the display:

Blank area for new step

Either:

  • Double-click the empty box on the display.
  • Use your arrow keys to move focus to the empty box, and then press the Enter key.
To name or rename a step:

Click the default label text (Step Name) on the step and edit the label.

Editing the step name

Note: If the step has focus, you can press Enter to enter the name of the step.

To associate a use case and its requirements (if any) with a step:

Double-click a step to open the Details window and use the fields and controls on the tabs to specify a use case and its requirements:

Details window

When you have entered the information about the use case, click OK to save it in the system.

Note: Click the Help icon ( Window help icon ) in the window to display information about working in this window.

The name of the use case (in the Use Case field) defaults to the name entered for the step on the map. You can change this name, or use the autocomplete ( Autocomplete icon ) to select a previously entered use case. If you select a previously entered use case, the system refreshes the information in the Details window to reflect the information for the specified use case.

Use the Shape field to select a process shape with the step. The Shape choice determines the color of the step on the map:

  • Sub Process - Blue
  • Human Based Step - Green
  • Automated Step - Yellow
  • Integration - Red
Working with the steps in a map:

To add a new step next to an existing step, add an alternate path, or delete a step from the map: right-click the step and select the appropriate option from the context menu:

Context menu on map step

Note: You can also select a step and press the Delete key to delete that step.

To reorder a step: click and hold it, and then drag and drop it at the new location.

To display only a specific subprocess: click the on the subprocess shape. The system refreshes the display to show only the subprocess (running from left to right) with a breadcrumb tail back to the original display:

Display of subprocess only

This feature is useful when the subprocess contains another subprocess, and you want to work with the steps in that subprocess that are not visible on the top layer of the map. For example, in the preceding image, a subprocess Process Order has been added to the Fulfill Purchase subprocess in the mapping example for the Purchase process. By displaying the Fulfill Purchase subprocess, you can see the Package Shipment and Ship steps in the Process Order subprocess.

To review the use case information for a particular step: double-click that step to open the Details window and see the information.

Relationship between maps and processes in the generated application

When the system generates an application using the application profile, it translates the profile's discovery map into starting processes and subprocesses in the new generated application, framework, or extended implementation.

The steps in the process are the shapes that appear in the diagram with the step names you entered into the map. Use cases specified for starting processes, subprocesses, integration, and automated shapes are populated in the Use Case field of the corresponding shape's property panel.

The draft processes, use cases, and requirements provide your team with a head start and solid starting point for to begin building out the flows and the application.

These process diagrams are two of the ones created from generating the application with the Start Purchase mapping example, illustrated in the preceding images.

Start Purchase starting process:

Start Purchase starting process

Enter Purchase subprocess, showing the property panel for the Confirm Order step, with the ConfirmOrder use case specified:

Enter Purchase subprocess

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Designing case type relationships

Case management applications typically have multiple processes and tasks, with multiple workers (caseworkers) collaborating in performing those tasks, ultimately to complete the work involved in the overall case. (See Case Management Overview for an introduction to case management and case design.)

At a high level, designing a case management application means decomposing the work, so that portions of the work can be performed by multiple workers at varying times and sequences. You typically organize cases and subcases in a hierarchy (see Introduction to Case Type Design for an example). In the Application Profiler, use the Case Tree view on the Create Processes step to organize this hierarchy as a tree-like structure of cases and subcases, so that when the system generates the starter application based on this profile, it also generates initial case and subcase relationships according to your defined structure.

Important: This Case Tree hierarchy is not equivalent to the class hierarchy, which governs rule inheritance and rule resolution in the system.

To display the Case Tree view:

On the Create Processes step of the Application Profiler, click the Case Tree link displayed on the Discovery Map view:

Case Tree view link on Discovery Map view

Note: To return to the Discovery Map view from the Case Tree view, select any of the View links in the Starting Process column. After selecting one of those links, the system displays the Discovery Map view and the discovery map for the selected process.

Case Tree view and links to discovery maps in Discovery Map view:

Case Tree view and links to discovery maps on Discovery Map view

Configuration Tip: Work types that you add in the Discovery Map view are initially listed as top-level cases in this Case Tree view. (A top-level case is one that has no parent case 'above' it.) For example, in the preceding image, NewHireCase, EquipmentRequest, and Hardware are work types that were added in the Discovery Map view. After toggling to the Case Treeview, they appear as top-level cases.

You can incorporate such a work type into the tree structure as either a sibling to a subcase already in the tree or as a child of a top-level case or a subcase already in the tree by right-clicking the case, selecting Add Case (to incorporate as a sibling to a subcase) or Add Sub Case (to incorporate as a child to another case) from the context menu, and then selecting the Use Existing radio button to specify the work type you want to incorporate.

Sample scenario of defining case and subcase relationships using the Case Tree view

This scenario extends the Onboarding application scenario described in Example: Typical sequence of making a profile for a simple application to incorporate additional business tasks involved in bringing a new employee onboard, such as setting up the employee's workspace, completing payroll forms, setting up benefits choices for medical and life insurance, and so on.

Globex's business analysts have identified those tasks that are required to fully bring a new employee onboard. Because a different Globex area and worker is responsible for resolving the work of the various tasks, the Globex team decomposes the work into the following case and subcase relationships:

Case/Subcase nameSubcase ofTypical caseworker
NewHireCaseNone (top-level case)HR staff member
 EquipmentRequestNewHireCaseHR staff member
  HardwareSetupEquipmentRequestIT worker
  SoftwareSetupEquipmentRequestIT worker
 WorkspaceRequestNewHireCaseHR staff member
  WorkspaceSetupWorkspaceRequestFacilities worker
  FurnitureSetupWorkspaceRequestFacilities worker
 PayrollNewHireCaseHR staff member
  TaxFormsPayrollFinance worker
  PaychecksPayrollFinance worker
 BenefitsNewHireCaseHR staff member
  MedicalInsuranceBenefitsHR Benefits staff member
  LifeInsuranceBenefitsHR Benefits staff member
 MentoringNewHireCaseHiring manager
  Days30MentoringPeer employee
Notes:
  • While representative of typical onboarding tasks, the above set is not meant to be an exhaustive list of every task a company would do to get a new employee onboard.
  • The caseworker identified for a case is the Globex job role that typically sets that case into motion. In this scenario, an HR staff member usually initiates the top-level case (NewHireCase), and initiates the immediate child cases of NewHireCase, which have their own subcases that are assigned to the different areas (Finance, HR Benefits, IT, Facilities, and so on). When designing your case management application, your organization would decompose the work into cases according to its unique situation.
  • While this application has only one top-level case (NewHireCase), an application can have multiple top-level cases, depending on how the organization wants to decompose the work. For example, in addition to a NewHireCase, Globex might add a ConsultantCase, for those tasks involved in bringing a consultant onboard. The top-level ConsultantCase might use the same EquipmentRequest and WorkspaceRequest subcases as NewHireCase, but not include the Benefits and Mentoring subcases.

Here is a picture of this structure after the case-subcase relationships are set in the Case Tree view:

Case tree for scenario application

Sequence for creating the example NewHireCase case structure

This article section gives an overview of the basic steps used when making a case structure like the NewHireCase scenario. While you can add work types in either the Discovery Map view or the Case Tree view, and specify the list of actors and process steps in any order, this example is one approach to follow for how to create the case-subcase relationships when creating the application profile.

The following sequence begins similarly to the Sequence for creating the profile for this simple scenario, after the Application Profiler has started. This time, because we know the system defaults the first work type to what is entered for Application Name in the Application Overview window, for convenience in not having to edit the name of the initial work type, enter the top-level case name (NewHireCase) as the Application Name. (You can update the application name later using the Actions > Overview menu action.)

Sequence stepUsingSample inputs/results
1. Capture basic project details.Application Overview window
Profile option:New Application
Build:New Framework
Build on Framework:None
Application Name:NewHireCase
2. Switch to the Case Tree view.Create Processes step - Discovery Mapview:

Click the Case Tree link.

Case Tree link on Discovery Map view

Case Tree view with initial case (work type) NewHireCase:

Case Tree view with initial case

3. Add child subcases to the initial top-level case.In the Case Tree view, in the Namecolumn:
  1. Right-click the top-level case and select Add Sub Case from the context menu. The Edit Work Type window opens.
  2. In the Edit Work Type window, specify the name of the subcase, and optionally update the default display label, prefix, and short description. Click OK to save the information.

Repeat steps a and b for each subcase of the top-level case.

  1. Right-click NewHireCase in the Name column and select Add Sub Case from the context menu:

Add Sub Case to NewHireCase

  1. Specify EquipmentRequest for the Name, add a space to the default display label (Equipment Request), specify ER for the prefix, and enter a short description. Click OK to complete.

Specify EquipmentRequest in Edit Work Type window

Repeat the steps to add the rest of NewHireCase's subcases (WorkspaceRequest, Payroll, Benefits, Mentoring). At this point, the case tree has the top and second levels completed:

Case tree for NewHireCase and second level of subcases

4. As appropriate, add subcases to the top-level case's subcases.For each of the subcases added in step 3, repeat steps 3.a and 3.b to add their subcases.
  1. Right-click EquipmentRequest in the Name column and select Add Sub Case from the context menu.

Add sub case to EquipmentRequest

  1. Specify HardwareSetup for the Name, add a space to the default display label (Hardware Setup), specify HW for the prefix, and enter a short description. Click OK to complete.

Repeat the steps to add the next level of subcases. At this point, the case tree has all of the levels completed:

Case tree for scenario application

5. Specify the caseworkers that participate in any of the tasks.Actors window (select Actions > Actors)Actors:
  • HR Staff Member
  • Hiring Manager
  • The System
  • IT Worker
  • Facilities Worker
  • Finance Worker
  • HR Benefits Staff Member
  • Peer Employee
   
Configuration Tip: When making a profile for a new application built on a framework, it is typical to incorporate existing work types from the framework into the case tree for the new application. To incorporate an existing work type into the case tree structure, after opening the Edit Work Type window using the Add Case or Add Sub Case button, select the Use Existingradio button in the Edit Work Type window, and then choose the work type.

Edit Work Type window when incorporating an existing work type into the case tree

At this point in our example, the Case Tree view displays the desired case relationships. Notice that the system has added a default starting process for each added subcase.

Case Tree view showing stub starting process

Select one of the processes to switch to the Discovery Map view and build out the process steps. For example, click on the View_StartWorkspaceRequest link to switch to the Discovery Map view and see the system-created default discovery map:

Discovery Map view for Start Workspace Request process

All of the case types added in the Case Tree view are displayed in the Work Type drop-down list on the Discovery Map view:

Work Type list on Discovery Map view

From here, for each work type, you would continue with Steps 4 and 5 in the sequence of steps for creating the profile:

  • Rename the default process names for each process (for example, adding spaces to make individual words in the process name)
  • Capture the essential process steps in discovery maps

Relationship between the case tree structure in the profile and in the generated application

When the system generates the application using the application profile, it translates the profile's case tree structure into case types in the new generated application, framework, or extended implementation. In the generated application, use the Case Designer gadget on the Case Management landing page to see the generated case tree, and further configure the case design from that initial starting point.

Case tree displayed in Case Designer after generation of the application

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Creating documents and project sizings from the profile information

A key benefit of capturing application and project information using the Application Profiler is that you can directly generate documents that describe the project and project sizings based on the information collected in the system itself. Profile and sizing documents can be created and attached to the profile any time during the life of the project. This enables you to interactively track information gathering progress and content and monitor estimated timelines and project size.

Creating a profile document

Use the Document action to have the system generate a Microsoft Word document that describes this application profile, using the information entered into the profile. After the system displays the generated file in Microsoft Word, you can optionally update it further, and save it to a location on your local system or network, or attach it to the application profile.

  1. Select Actions > Document. The Document window opens.

Document window

  1. Optional: Upload a Microsoft Word file (.doc or .docx) to provide custom content in the generated document (for example to include details about the opportunity and benefits of the application). The file's content is included in the Executive Summary section of the output document. Clicking the Download Blank Templateprovides a Word file that you can use as a starting point.

    Note: If a custom-content file has been uploaded for this profile, the file is listed in the Document window. Once a custom-content file is uploaded, to insert different content, upload a new file to replace the existing one. To omit the custom content, create an empty Word file and upload it.

  2. Select the template for the system to use for the generated document. The standard choices are:
    • Pegasystems Certified Partner Led Engagement - Typically used when a Pegasystems Certified Partner is leading the project for this application.
    • Pegasystems Led Engagement - Typically used when Pegasystems is leading the project for this application.
    • Self Led Engagement - Typically used when the organization itself is leading the project for this application.
  3. Optional: Select whether to have the system automatically attach the document to the profile when the profile is saved.
  4. Optional: Select whether to omit the discovery map images from the output document. If there are many processes and subprocesses in the application, you might want to consider omitting the images to reduce the length of the output document.
  5. Optional: Select a document option. Options appear when the profile is for an application built on a framework or is updating an existing application. In those situations, you can select whether to document the full content of the application profile or only what is changing or added to the base original application.
  6. Click Generate Document. The system merges the information and then opens Microsoft Word on your local system and displays the generated file.
Example of output document pages:

Sample pages from output document

After the document has loaded in the Microsoft Word window, use the SaveAs feature in Microsoft Word to save the document to your local system or network.

Repeat these steps whenever you want to document the most current version of the profile.

Creating project sizings from the profile information

You can create, edit, and attach a sizing estimate for the project based on information specified in the profile and in the sizing spreadsheet.

  1. Select Actions > Sizing. The Sizing window opens, and displays a color-coded timeline that graphically illustrates the latest sizing data for the project phases.

Sizing window

  1. Click Create Project Sizing to launch Microsoft Excel in a separate window and display a modeling tool that pulls in information you have entered in the profile.
  2. When the sizing sheet displays, you can review it, edit the data, and save it to a file.
    • When you edit the spreadsheet, do not update values defaulted from data entered through the input steps. Instead, change them in the profile step and create the sizing again.
    • Adjustments can be made to the hours and other sizing data fields other than what is captured and defaulted from the profile. Changes are preserved in the sizing document if you attach it to the profile.
    • Information not maintained by the profiler can be stored in the spreadsheet.
    • When you create a new sizing, the last saved version of the spreadsheet displays.
  3. Click Attach Project Sizing to attach the spreadsheet to the profile.
  4. Click OK to save the screen data. Click Cancel to close the window.

Repeat these steps whenever you want to resize the project and save the most recent sizing estimate. The system includes these sizings in the output document when you generate a document using the Actions > Document choice.

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Navigating the Application Profiler

The Application Profiler is dynamic — the system refreshes the available steps and fields based on selections that you make.

When the Application Profiler starts, the system assigns and displays a Profile ID. For example, the following image shows profile AP-6 in the Application Profiler display:

Application Profiler tab and its steps in the Designer Studio

On any step of the Application Profiler, click the Help icon ( Contextual help in the wizard ) to display help about that step, including choices for fields and controls used in that step. In any secondary window opened from the Application Profiler (such as the Application Overview window), click the window's Help icon ( Window help icon ) to display help about the fields and controls used in that window.

The Steps

The steps of the Application Profiler are designed to guide you through the process of capturing the information needed in an application profile. Click the step name to move to that step and specify the information associated with that aspect of the application or project area. For example, to specify the roles of people expected to participate in the project, click Participants. When a step has been visited once, it displays a green checkmark (Green checkmark).

You can work on the steps in any order, and optionally omit steps if they are not relevant to your project.

The following list provides short descriptions of what to use each step for. For more in-depth details of how to use the fields and controls on each step, see the online help (Contextual help in the wizard) for that step.

Create Processes
Use this step to:
  • Define work types and their starting processes.
  • Create visual maps of the processes using discovery maps
  • Organize work types into structures of cases and subcases

This step has two distinct views: the Discovery Map view and the Case Tree view. You can toggle back and forth between the two views. Usually you choose which view to work in based on your situation and what you want to focus on. For example, if all of the work types and processes are already defined and you want to focus on building the case tree, choose the Case Tree view. If you are starting from scratch and want to focus on capturing the process for one work type, choose the Discovery Map view.

Interfaces
Use this step to specify details about interfaces to external systems that the application will either connect to or be called from as a service.
Reporting
Use this step to indicate the level of reporting detail required by the application. If you select High, you can optionally create a list including standard and custom reports.
Correspondence
Correspondence includes all types of notification used by the application including letters, emails, and faxes. On this step, you indicate the level of correspondence (high or low) this application requires. If you select High on this step, you can optionally create a list of the pieces of correspondence and details about each of them.
Assumptions
Use this step to specify a list of assumptions for the project. Assumptions do not create rules when the profile is used by the Application Accelerator. They provide details about the project assumptions in the profile document.
Participants
Use this step to specify the project participants and their roles. This list helps to identify the anticipated resources required to implement the project.
Project Explorer
Use this step to examine use cases, requirements, work types, and supporting use case types already defined for the application, and optionally modify their details, delete them, or add new ones.

This step includes the Finish button to complete the application profile. Clicking Finish resolves the profile in the system, which allows the system to use it to generate an application.

The Actions

Use the Actions menu's choices (actions) to:

  • Provide additional input about the overall project and the profile (such as sizing estimates and who can access this profile).
  • Perform profile-related actions, such as saving a profile or creating the application profile document.
ActionUse to
Create a list of actors who perform work in the application. Actors referenced in use cases are entered here.
Create delegated application profiles when multiple resources need to work on the profile content simultaneously.
Create the application profile document (in Microsoft Word format).
Specify information about the type of application, the project, and business objectives the profile defines. Note: Changing the Application Overview information in this screen while in the process of completing the profile can result in the removal of previously entered information.
Create a list of users who can access and change the profile.
Create a sizing estimate for the project based on information in the profile and optionally attached sizing spreadsheet.
Create a zip file of the profile.
Save work in progress before you exit a window or the profile.

Best practice tip: Use this action to periodically save your work in progress whenever you enter information into a profile. While the system automatically saves detail entered in a profile step as you move from that step to another, periodically saving your work is helpful on steps where you are entering large amounts of data over a period of time (such as when working on the Create Processes or Project Explorer steps).

Withdraw the profile.

When you no longer need a profile and want to remove it (for example, a trial profile used to test some project assumptions), use this action to resolve and withdraw the profile. After the Withdraw action, the profile cannot be used to populate data in the Application Accelerator.

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Additional information

DCO 6.2 - Using the Application Document Wizard

Introduction to the Case Designer

  • Previous topic Understanding the Class structure and RuleSets generated by the Application Accelerator
  • Next topic DCO 6.2 and 6.3 - Using the Application Accelerator
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